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I want to know: do you use 5w20 oil?


spidermann59
07-04-2007, 01:48 PM
Will my 2005 taurus 3.0 vulcan last with using such a light weight oil? Do you believe in 5w20 oil in all climents???

Huney1
07-04-2007, 03:06 PM
We hashed this out before. Modern engines are "put up tight" and the tolerances are very small so it takes a thin oil to get in there when you first crank it up. Oil also acts as a coolant and it needs to circulate freely to dissipate more heat. Fords MotorCraft Blended Oil is half synthetic and it is a very good oil and if the Cop cars use it it should be good enough for us. I know, I live in SC and it looks like thin water. Traveling salesman was waiting to get his oil changed and said he demanded 5W-20 in his Crovn Vic and got over 300,000 mi out of the last Crown Vic he has using the Ford blend 5W-20 oil. If you want to go totally synthetic Pennzoil is making a Platinum oil that is good and WalMart SuperTech is inexpensive, like $14.00 for five quarts and while we're about it their oil filters are cheap and very good. SuperTech synthetic 5W-20and SuperTech oil filter keep my 03 Vulcan going strong.

way2old
07-04-2007, 05:25 PM
And to disprove Huney1's theory---We use 15w40 in everything we have. We have about 1400 vehicles and have not lost an engine due to an oil related failure. Sorry Huney1. Just had to throw that in there. We also have no timing chain componet failures on the Crown Victoria as is noted by outside shops. Good luck and keep the pot stirred. ;)

Huney1
07-04-2007, 08:07 PM
Hmmm . . . Like I said, we hashed this out before and I provided several links disproving the theory "thicker is better." http://www.carbibles.com/engineoil_bible.html

Stay with me here. 5-10-15-20 where there are four numbers. 15-20-25-30-35-40 six numbers. OK, everytime you change a number it means you must have more additives and they take the place of oil. Namely, Antiwear additives, detergent, dispersant, inhibitors, friction modifiers, viscosity modifiers, pour point depressant, seat swell agent and anti foamant. 5W-20 has less overall aditives than 15-40 which actually contains less oil.

Then I constantly read advice like this: "The best thing to do is use the appropriate viscosity for your engine and climate as recommended by the manufacturer. In general, newer vehicles will specify lower viscosity oils such as 5W-30 while older vehicles will specify higher viscosity oils such as 20W-50. This is because today’s engines are built with tighter bearing clearances to take advantage of the fuel economy benefits of lower viscosity oils. It is not really a good idea to use thicker oil in one of these engines because it will disrupt the oil flow characteristics of the engine and may create excessively high oil pressure."

Ford has spend millions to dollars to determine the right oil for their engines inclucing the 4.6 V8 which also uses 5W-20. What puzzles me is people come here asking what is best and we usually tell them follow Fords owner manual and adhere to the maintenance schedule. Then our moderator comes along and says Ford knows from didley squat, use motor molasses 15W-40 oil. Don't you run a state highway dept garage or something?

RickMN
07-04-2007, 09:09 PM
I may be wrong, but I don't think there's a single manufacturer that recommends a multi-visc oil that includes going up to 40w. The VI improvers needed to get an oil up to 40W have proven to carbon up on the rings and cause major problems.

Way2old may use it on his fleet, but you take his advice at your own risk. My advice, stick with 5w-20. It's more energy efficient and reduces start-up wear.

way2old
07-05-2007, 06:54 AM
"Ford has spend millions to dollars to determine the right oil for their engines inclucing the 4.6 V8 which also uses 5W-20. What puzzles me is people come here asking what is best and we usually tell them follow Fords owner manual and adhere to the maintenance schedule. Then our moderator comes along and says Ford knows from didley squat, use motor molasses 15W-40 oil. Don't you run a state highway dept garage or something?"

Hey Huney1. I never said not to use what is recommended from the manufacturer. If I did, please show me where I said anything that says the engineers at a manufacturer does not know any thing. I simply stated we use 15w40 in our fleet of vehicles. In all my personal vehicles, I use what is recommended by the manufacturer. We are a government fleet and purchase oil in bulk quantities and we get lower price on the 15w40 than any other grade. So due to the powers that be, we use the cheapest bid product. We also may not have all the troubles the outside agencies because we do change our oil on a very regular basis. It also differs from the manufacturer's guidelines. But it works for us. I did not mean to ruffle your feathers, but there is always more than one side to the story. You can search the internet and other places and see all the tests that each manufacturer does and their brand is always the best. It is like being in a class on theory. Somethime the theory works in the real world, and sometimes you have to bend the line a little to make tha theory work.

And yes Huney1, I run a local Police and general government fleet and have been in automotive repair for over 50 years total. So there is a lot I have seen, tested, used, proved, and disproved various products over that time. So as I stated earlier, please show me where I have said to ignore manufacturers specifications on any product they use or install on their products. Keep web searching and I will keep grease under my nails. Good comparing notes with you again though.

Huney1
07-05-2007, 11:41 AM
Everytime the subject of engine oil arises we get into the same thing and from what I see your idea is thicker is better. In some cases that may apply but not in the case of Fords Taurus. Tug boats we used the Shell Rotella thick but don't remember the numbers now. Anyway, let each chose the one to his liking and rock on, but as for me I'll do what my old First Sgt always said, "READ THE FREAKIN' MANUAL."

Business booming so have to get back to work.

way2old
07-05-2007, 02:02 PM
As you said---move on. The poster asked for an opinion and I gave mine. Just because I don't agree with everyone else, doesn't make me the bad guy. Our fleet has proven that you can run a different weight of oil if needed. The manufacturer recommends a specific viscosity foreach vehicle they produce. Sorry if I stepped on anyone's toes. But I am gonna quote a man named Huney1 from a long time ago. He said he was going to post his opinion to whatever he felt like. So will I.

way2old
07-05-2007, 05:12 PM
I am going to apologize to the forum members for my replies in this post. Sometimes it irks me when a person that is not a technician reads the internet and posts links to places that are to be taken as the word of automotive gods. My point in all of this is there are various ways to go at any problem. Theory is a good starting point, but sometimes common sense needs to be introduced. I guess if I read the internet and posted to Huney1 about what is supposed to be done in his profession I can be close to an expert there. I am by no means an automotive expert. I learn everyday and use these forums as a learning tool. So if I hurt Huney1's feelings or intelligence or anyone elses, I apologize to him and to all the members and guests that frequent these forums.

Ian Szgatti
07-05-2007, 08:05 PM
I run a local Police and general government fleet and have been in automotive repair for over 50 years total. So there is a lot I have seen, tested, used, proved, and disproved various products over that time.
I am by no means an automotive expert.

ok then....

well, Unlce Sam has the bucks, but for less vibration from your oil starved bearings upon start-up, and for ease of flow and higher protection from oil burn-off, stick with MotorCraft 5w20. matter of fact, use any 5w20 you want, but at the very least it should be that grade and a semi-synthetic blend.

the 15w40 is great in some applications, like tractors, diesel cars, or fleet vehicles where cost is a factor and they scrap the cars once the engines old anyway. 15w40 is not suitable for your car though. It does not offer adequate protection at start up because it takes a little longer for the oil to get flowing... most times you'll hear a shudder while firing the car up, and thats the sound of the crankshaft banging around becuase it doesnt have enough oil to ride on. A 5w20 though means it's a 5 weight oil when cold, and as such, flows fast and free. Since at operating tempreture its only a 20 weight oil, it has an appropriate viscosity, but still flows freely enough to be concidered efficient. Efficient means that the engine doesnt have to devote as much of its power production into pumping thick oil through the pump, filter, and passages... instead it can redirect that power into the drive-train. Since motorcraft is a semi-synthetic, that thinner oil is more resistant to oil burn off because it has a higher flash point...

anyways... the company may think it's saving money because the oil is cheaper... but it's what they cant see that costs them the same, if not more. hey the oil is cheap, but the milage suffers, and combustion is dirtier, and internal damage occurs faster, reducing efficiency further, but the oil is cheap!!! Or, the oil is costly, but the milage is good, and the cars dont pollute as much, but the oil is costly... not as costly as increased emmsions and gasoline and.... sh[oo]t.. whatever

Im in the trade myself...and I do concider myself well rounded by means of college education. ultimately, I dont give a rats a[r]s[e] about who uses what, but I would recommend a 5w20 for you spiderman.

GPFred
07-06-2007, 01:10 PM
I've got a 98 Taurus with the vulcan engine. I bought the car with 33K on it and used nothing but Quaker State 5W30. The manual called for 5w30 and now the car has 118K. No leaks, drips, or errors. The car runs fine and I still get 18-21 around town and 28-30 on the highway. It runs great. I guess all I am saying is that I usually follow the manual for the proper viscosity oil to use and have never had a mechanical problem (engine wise) with any car I have had.

Huney1
07-07-2007, 07:29 AM
Good info there and thanks to everyone for contributing. Yes, immediate lubrication after start up is most important and it is no secret some pilots add cup of STP to their oil just because it sticks to the bearings so well and sometimes planes sit a long time between flights. You see pictures of men turning the props on the big WWII bombers radial engines, called pulling-it-through, and that's to get the oil pumped up in the bearings and galleys so as not to cause so much wear at start up.

Here's a good one for you to learn something. The big radial recipicating aircraft engines had twenty four cylinders and the pistons were as big a gallon paint cans yet the engines were only eight feet long. How can they cram 24 cylinders into an engine 8 ft long? The clue is RADIAL engine meaning the pistons were arranged in three circles eight cylinders to the bank. Another clue is the short length had to do with the crankshaft. :dunno: By all rights, even if it was a V-24 arrangement the crank would still have to be at least 20 feet long.

http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache:7WkZlNJYmWgJ:www2.tech.purdue.edu/At/courses/AEML/powerplantimages/parts,%2520bearings,%2520gearing.ppt+articulating+ crankshaft&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=us
Click the link then open with power point viewer. Hold the cursor over a picture and right click then select slide 26. How 'bout them apples? Pretty slick, huh? Notice the one Master Rod and other Articulating Rods. The old boy that thought that one up was doing some heavy thinking and the reason we can cram so much power into such a small space.

Excellent graphic of how they work here: Is that toooocool or what?
http://www.century-of-flight.freeola.com/Aviation%20history/evolution%20of%20technology/aero%20engine.htm

bruker
07-09-2007, 06:39 AM
I used Motorcraft semi-synthetic 5w20 in my `01 Windstar and it had 204,000 miles on it when I sold it. I'm now using Penzoil Platinum 5w20 in my `04 Taurus with the Duratec and I'm changing the oil & filter at 10,000 intervals. I now have ~65,000 miles on it.

Huney1
07-09-2007, 09:30 PM
I used Motorcraft semi-synthetic 5w20 in my `01 Windstar and it had 204,000 miles on it when I sold it. I'm now using Penzoil Platinum 5w20 in my `04 Taurus with the Duratec and I'm changing the oil & filter at 10,000 intervals. I now have ~65,000 miles on it.

I read a test on a Boss Mustang running Mobil1 doing 10K oil changes and the oil analysis was not bad either.

wafrederick
07-12-2007, 05:56 PM
Put in 5w-20 or the lifters will rattle.If you put in the wrong oil in Fords,the lifters will rattle.I have heard of this happening in Fords,one guy brought one in because the lifters were rattling and it was the wrong grade oil.Luckily the guy bought this one from another person whom put an extended warranty on it, a superduty truck with the V10 and it was covered under warranty

Huney1
07-12-2007, 06:09 PM
Valves rattle? Way back younder I had a F-150, think it was a 1970 V8 auto tranny and I used straight 30W HD same as we used in the Detriot Diesels. Had some tranny problems and burned fuel like crazy but the engine was always perfect. Maybe the late models are the ones that rattle.

wafrederick
07-16-2007, 06:44 PM
Go by the general rule,go by the owner's manual or on the emissions label on some fords.

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