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'99 suburban fuel gauge


ncleo
01-27-2006, 09:46 AM
I have a '99 suburban and my fuel gauge is acting strange. Usually when my truck gets to about 1/4 tank, my guage starts acting strange. It will go up and then down. The first time I noticed it was I knew I was going to need to fill the tank the next time I used it because it was around 1/4 full. When my son and I got in to go the tank was 3/4 full, I asked if he filled it, he didn't, so we figured that my husband filled it, well later that day we ran out of gas. When asking if my husband filled it he said no. Then I started noticing when it started to run low my guage would go up, and then down, up and down. I went to the gas station to fill up and the tank was full, or at least on the guage it was.

What could it be, it only behaves like this when the tank get to about 1/4. Or at least that is when I notice it. I have run out of gas 2 times because of this.

ncleo

wardriver
01-29-2006, 10:12 AM
A walk down memory lane.

I had the same thing, a sensor is screwed up.

They have to drop the tank to fix it. I had the extended warranty which covered it.

Otherwise a costly fix. Unless you can drop your own tank.

semisendiz
01-30-2006, 11:35 AM
Any Idea On Which Sensor It Is? I Can Drop My Tank.
My '99 Suburban Does The Same, Except For The Fact That It Starts Acting Up From Indicating A Little Less Than Half Tank.

mtmaurer8ooo
01-30-2006, 04:41 PM
You most likely need a new fuel sending unit, and depending on how many miles you have on your truck it might not be a bad idea to change the fuel pump while you're in there too. The reason I mention this is that in a lot of cases you can get a fuel pump/sender as one part and it can save you money and Chevy doesn't always have the best luck w/ fuel pumps. But I am ususally a 'if it ain't broke' kinda guy, but just food for thought. That being said, whatever you decide, it does sound like you will be needing a fuel sending unit to me. I remember reading something a while back about Chevy senders and the fact that a certain amount of corrosion can really wreak havoc on that system. It seems that the senders in most Chevy vehicles are just like any other rheostat(heat control switches, dimmer switches, etc), and the coil corrodes causing the strange fluctuations that you are experiencing. I DON'T know if this applies to your specific vehicle but the info I read did apply to most trucks in the late 90's, especially if you have an 'older' body style 'Burban. So, definately something to check into. In the mean time I would suggest keeping the tank full so you don't have the 'running out of gas' problem anymore. I hope that this helps. Later. M.

chschapira
02-03-2006, 02:26 PM
The solution to this problem is to replace the fuel pump/sender module. This behavior is a warning to a pending fuel pump failure. The job is very simple. Aslo all the aftermarket pumps run much quieter than the pump originally installed. Even the pump from GM. The pump/sender module should run you between $275-$400 depending on where you purchase the unit. To replace the unit you will need to lower the fuel tank. Do this when the tank is near empty. With a wandering gauge this could be difficult. However I recommend filling the tank. Then driving about 400 miles. This should leave you with 4-6 gallons in the tank. At approximately 8 pounds a gallon this makes lowering the tank by yourself or with a floor jack much easier. You will need a flat blade screwdriver, a 15mm socket, a 3/8 quick disconnet fitting removal tool and a pair of pliers. A floor jack will also make the removal; and installation easier. The screwdriver is used to loosen the hose clamps on the hoses at the fill neck. The 15mm socket to remove the bolts securingthe mounting straps. The 3/8 quick disconnect fitting removal tool to remove the feed and return lines from the sender/pump module. The pliers to remove the securing ring on teh pump/sender unit. This job should take the average person with a basic skill set 2-3 hours to complete.

SM401
04-18-2006, 04:52 PM
I have a 98 Burb that I bought with 100K on it. A new fuel pump had just been put in. A month after I bought it, the gauge started acting up. Read on another site that it was likely a buildup of deposits on the sensor. Recommended using fuel-injector cleaner type additives. Tried that - and eventually seemed to help - but it's acting up again. Not worth the repair cost at this point - so we just hit the trip odometer on every fill-up and then we check the mileage instead of the gas gauge. 400-450 miles for city driving, 600 or so for freeway driving.

frootl00p3
11-02-2007, 11:34 AM
I have a 98 Burb that I bought with 100K on it. A new fuel pump had just been put in. A month after I bought it, the gauge started acting up. Read on another site that it was likely a buildup of deposits on the sensor. Recommended using fuel-injector cleaner type additives. Tried that - and eventually seemed to help - but it's acting up again. Not worth the repair cost at this point - so we just hit the trip odometer on every fill-up and then we check the mileage instead of the gas gauge. 400-450 miles for city driving, 600 or so for freeway driving.
I have a 99 burb with the older body. My guage started "bouncing" about a year ago. I didn't much worry about it, because it wasn't the first car I had with a non-working gauge, but I did start tracking my mileage on paper and with the odometer. I have a tornado fuel saver and the large 44 gal tank, and my mileage started off at about 21 miles per gallon, average. After about 6 months my mileage severly dropped to about 15, then to 13, then 11, and recently I was averaging 7 to 9. At $3 plus per gallon that hurts. Thought all was OK until three days ago when my car died like it was out of gas, this of course was on halloween night with a car load of kids. I had filled up my car on Monday, driven 200 miles. A friend brought me 5 gallons of gas and I couldn't get started. I had to put 18 gallons of gas in my tank to get enough gas to the pump for it to get enough suction to get fuel to the engine. I ended up getting a full year out of my pump after the sensor went out, but my advise would be to track the mileage and fix the pump/ sensor unit when your mileage drops. I am now in crisis repair mode and it stinks.

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